April shower. A cold shower moved across the valley and ascended the Pahsimeroi Hills one recent evening. Small amounts of rain have been falling daily for a week or more. Weeds are waxing strong. Jim Connor photos

,

Feral grape hyacinths bloom in the lawn grass in a local yard. Tiny, rice-sized bulbs were planted into a flower bed decades ago. Jim Connor photos

,

Members of a termite colony using a piece of sheet metal as a roof scramble for cover when the cover is removed. The insects have constructed an elaborate structure of dirt and saliva under the tin. Smaller juvenile larvae are put to work at a young age. The larger individuals are in the last juvenile stage and are called nymphs. They have eyes, distinct heads and mobile wing-buds. Soon they will molt for the last time and take to the air as winged adults in order to mate and found new colonies. At least two soldiers can be seen at the upper right edge of the photo. Jim Connor photos

,

These two termite nymphs were hanging on the ceiling, a piece of sheet metal, when it was removed suddenly. They have dark eyes and distinct wing-buds. After a final molt, they will have long wings and go on mating flights attracting swallows, bats and other insect eaters. Survivors will found new colonies. Jim Connor photos

,

White lichens eating rocks and minerals. Lichens are living organisms that actually break down rocks and soils to extract minerals. They consist of algae and fungal cells that work together. Algae create sugars from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, while the fungus cells dissolve the rock. Jim Connor photos

The methane makers Winds were blowing clouds and drops of rain around wildly. Once in a while, pellets of graupel — tiny balls of snow — beat on the window. They bounced and... + continue reading

April shower. A cold shower moved across the valley and ascended the Pahsimeroi Hills one recent evening. Small amounts of rain have been falling daily for a week or more. Weeds are waxing strong. Jim Connor photos

,

Feral grape hyacinths bloom in the lawn grass in a local yard. Tiny, rice-sized bulbs were planted into a flower bed decades ago. Jim Connor photos

,

Members of a termite colony using a piece of sheet metal as a roof scramble for cover when the cover is removed. The insects have constructed an elaborate structure of dirt and saliva under the tin. Smaller juvenile larvae are put to work at a young age. The larger individuals are in the last juvenile stage and are called nymphs. They have eyes, distinct heads and mobile wing-buds. Soon they will molt for the last time and take to the air as winged adults in order to mate and found new colonies. At least two soldiers can be seen at the upper right edge of the photo. Jim Connor photos

,

These two termite nymphs were hanging on the ceiling, a piece of sheet metal, when it was removed suddenly. They have dark eyes and distinct wing-buds. After a final molt, they will have long wings and go on mating flights attracting swallows, bats and other insect eaters. Survivors will found new colonies. Jim Connor photos

,

White lichens eating rocks and minerals. Lichens are living organisms that actually break down rocks and soils to extract minerals. They consist of algae and fungal cells that work together. Algae create sugars from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, while the fungus cells dissolve the rock. Jim Connor photos

The methane makers Winds were blowing clouds and drops of rain around wildly. Once in a while, pellets of graupel — tiny balls of snow — beat on the window. They bounced and... + continue reading

April shower. A cold shower moved across the valley and ascended the Pahsimeroi Hills one recent evening. Small amounts of rain have been falling daily for a week or more. Weeds are waxing strong. Jim Connor photos

,

Feral grape hyacinths bloom in the lawn grass in a local yard. Tiny, rice-sized bulbs were planted into a flower bed decades ago. Jim Connor photos

,

Members of a termite colony using a piece of sheet metal as a roof scramble for cover when the cover is removed. The insects have constructed an elaborate structure of dirt and saliva under the tin. Smaller juvenile larvae are put to work at a young age. The larger individuals are in the last juvenile stage and are called nymphs. They have eyes, distinct heads and mobile wing-buds. Soon they will molt for the last time and take to the air as winged adults in order to mate and found new colonies. At least two soldiers can be seen at the upper right edge of the photo. Jim Connor photos

,

These two termite nymphs were hanging on the ceiling, a piece of sheet metal, when it was removed suddenly. They have dark eyes and distinct wing-buds. After a final molt, they will have long wings and go on mating flights attracting swallows, bats and other insect eaters. Survivors will found new colonies. Jim Connor photos

,

White lichens eating rocks and minerals. Lichens are living organisms that actually break down rocks and soils to extract minerals. They consist of algae and fungal cells that work together. Algae create sugars from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, while the fungus cells dissolve the rock. Jim Connor photos

The methane makers Winds were blowing clouds and drops of rain around wildly. Once in a while, pellets of graupel — tiny balls of snow — beat on the window. They bounced and... + continue reading

April shower. A cold shower moved across the valley and ascended the Pahsimeroi Hills one recent evening. Small amounts of rain have been falling daily for a week or more. Weeds are waxing strong. Jim Connor photos

,

Feral grape hyacinths bloom in the lawn grass in a local yard. Tiny, rice-sized bulbs were planted into a flower bed decades ago. Jim Connor photos

,

Members of a termite colony using a piece of sheet metal as a roof scramble for cover when the cover is removed. The insects have constructed an elaborate structure of dirt and saliva under the tin. Smaller juvenile larvae are put to work at a young age. The larger individuals are in the last juvenile stage and are called nymphs. They have eyes, distinct heads and mobile wing-buds. Soon they will molt for the last time and take to the air as winged adults in order to mate and found new colonies. At least two soldiers can be seen at the upper right edge of the photo. Jim Connor photos

,

These two termite nymphs were hanging on the ceiling, a piece of sheet metal, when it was removed suddenly. They have dark eyes and distinct wing-buds. After a final molt, they will have long wings and go on mating flights attracting swallows, bats and other insect eaters. Survivors will found new colonies. Jim Connor photos

,

White lichens eating rocks and minerals. Lichens are living organisms that actually break down rocks and soils to extract minerals. They consist of algae and fungal cells that work together. Algae create sugars from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, while the fungus cells dissolve the rock. Jim Connor photos

The methane makers Winds were blowing clouds and drops of rain around wildly. Once in a while, pellets of graupel — tiny balls of snow — beat on the window. They bounced and... + continue reading

April shower. A cold shower moved across the valley and ascended the Pahsimeroi Hills one recent evening. Small amounts of rain have been falling daily for a week or more. Weeds are waxing strong. Jim Connor photos

,

Feral grape hyacinths bloom in the lawn grass in a local yard. Tiny, rice-sized bulbs were planted into a flower bed decades ago. Jim Connor photos

,

Members of a termite colony using a piece of sheet metal as a roof scramble for cover when the cover is removed. The insects have constructed an elaborate structure of dirt and saliva under the tin. Smaller juvenile larvae are put to work at a young age. The larger individuals are in the last juvenile stage and are called nymphs. They have eyes, distinct heads and mobile wing-buds. Soon they will molt for the last time and take to the air as winged adults in order to mate and found new colonies. At least two soldiers can be seen at the upper right edge of the photo. Jim Connor photos

,

These two termite nymphs were hanging on the ceiling, a piece of sheet metal, when it was removed suddenly. They have dark eyes and distinct wing-buds. After a final molt, they will have long wings and go on mating flights attracting swallows, bats and other insect eaters. Survivors will found new colonies. Jim Connor photos

,

White lichens eating rocks and minerals. Lichens are living organisms that actually break down rocks and soils to extract minerals. They consist of algae and fungal cells that work together. Algae create sugars from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, while the fungus cells dissolve the rock. Jim Connor photos

The methane makers Winds were blowing clouds and drops of rain around wildly. Once in a while, pellets of graupel — tiny balls of snow — beat on the window. They bounced and... + continue reading

Members of a termite colony using a piece of sheet metal as a roof scramble for cover when the cover is removed. The insects have constructed an elaborate structure of dirt and saliva under the tin. Smaller juvenile larvae are put to work at a young age. The larger individuals are in the last juvenile stage and are called nymphs. They have eyes, distinct heads and mobile wing-buds. Soon they will molt for the last time and take to the air as winged adults in order to mate and found new colonies. At least two soldiers can be seen at the upper right edge of the photo. Jim Connor photos

Feral grape hyacinths bloom in the lawn grass in a local yard. Tiny, rice-sized bulbs were planted into a flower bed decades ago. Jim Connor photos

April shower. A cold shower moved across the valley and ascended the Pahsimeroi Hills one recent evening. Small amounts of rain have been falling daily for a week or more. Weeds are waxing strong. Jim Connor photos

White lichens eating rocks and minerals. Lichens are living organisms that actually break down rocks and soils to extract minerals. They consist of algae and fungal cells that work together. Algae create sugars from carbon dioxide, water and sunlight, while the fungus cells dissolve the rock. Jim Connor photos

These two termite nymphs were hanging on the ceiling, a piece of sheet metal, when it was removed suddenly. They have dark eyes and distinct wing-buds. After a final molt, they will have long wings and go on mating flights attracting swallows, bats and other insect eaters. Survivors will found new colonies. Jim Connor photos

Home Page

News

Kenzie Tappan rides the mechanical bull. Outdoor photos by Todd Adams

Thursday, 04/27/17
Challis and Patterson elementary school students had fun learning about the importance of natural resources to the community and economy at Custer Soil and Water Conservation District’... + continue reading

Challis Jr.-Sr. High School student Daryn Provence finds it hard to put his fingers in the holes of a bowling ball while wearing vision-distorting goggles that simulate being drunk. Classmates Valerie Moen and Jordyn Ellis can’t keep from laughing as they help. Todd Adams photos

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CCC Director Laura Hunt directs Kasen Hohnstein on the simulated DUI course. Todd Adams photos

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Will Millick and Justin Rembelski work on a wooden block tower while wearing vision-distorting goggles. Todd Adams photos

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Alex Oliveria (left) and other poster contest participants do a “drum roll” as the winners are announced. Aso pictured are Austyn Erickson (back row), Kya Madsen, Valerie Moen (back row), Grace Kowarko, Alex Mora, Deaviney Bowen and Delilah Mulliniks. Alex Oliveria (left) and other poster contest participants do a “drum roll” as the winners are announced. Aso pictured are Austyn Erickson (back row), Kya Madsen, Valerie Moen (back row), Grace Kowarko, Alex Mora, Deaviney Bowen and Delilah Mulliniks. Todd Adams photos

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Carmin Somerville and Kelli Ann Strand watch as Bruin Bradshaw tries the ring toss while wearing DUI goggles. Todd Adams photos

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CCC Director Laura Hunt, Custer County Sheriff's Deputy Crissi Gilchrist and CHS Counselor Ang Sugden show students the vision-distorting goggles that simulate being drunk or high on marijuana. Todd Adams photos

04/27/17

Sports

JoAnna Campbell approaches for the vault. Debora Sheppeard photos

Thursday, 04/27/17
A wet day in Salmon last Thursday did not deter the Challis track and field teams, who put up some big marks at the Salmon Invitational. Junior Keaton Kikuyama continued her dominance in... + continue reading

Jazmine Rivera hurdles over the brand new lineup at the Dow Dean Invite. Deb Sheppeard photos

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Ross Sheppeard throws the discus at the Dow Dean Invite. Deb Sheppeard photos

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Ross Sheppeard hands off to Dakota Petersen in Lane 3 of the new track. Deb Sheppeard photos

04/20/17

Cheyenne Escalera bats. Lily Verhoeven photos

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Mitch Cotant steals third base. Lily Verhoeven photos

04/20/17

Opinions

Thursday, 03/23/17
When you send comments to the feds about their rules and proposals, you don’t generally put those comments in blank verse. But that’s what I did this time. When I finally... + continue reading

Local Scenes

Thursday, 04/27/17
Derek Munson, author of Enemy Pie and Bad Dad, spent the day on April 13 with the students at Stanley School. His visit to the school was sponsored by Stanley Library. + continue reading

Milestones

Dottie Tate Sims

Thursday, 04/20/17
Welcome, Dottie Tate Sims, born December 30, 2016, to Barry and Dani Sims weighing 7 lbs. 2 oz. Proud grandparents are Heidi Thomas and Jim and Barb Thomas of Challis and Barry and Olivia... + continue reading

Briefly

Thursday, 04/27/17
May 1–4 Monday–Thursday breakfast: Assorted breakfast with fruit, juice and milk. Monday: Lunch is a corn dog, macaroni and cheese, ketchup, baked beans, corn, variety of... + continue reading

Articles Images

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Shrubs with sharp thorns dare to be the first to put out tender new leaves. Needle-sharp thorns may deter winter-starved browsers from stripping all the new leaves. Shown here is a gooseberry branch. Following closely with green is the Wood’s rose, Idaho’s only native rose. Jim Connor Photos

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